Peter, Do You Love Me Verse John 21:15-19

After his resurrection, Jesus appear to the disciples several times. One fascinating scene comes when Jesus restores St. Peter the Apostle in John chapter 21. Three times the LORD asks Peter, “Do you love me?” After the disciples’ affirmation, Jesus confirms Peter’s mission to “feed my sheep.” Listed below is this whole exchange in parallel Bible translations (including the King James Version) to give a full explanation and meaning of John 21:15-19. These events are proceeded by the Miraculous catch in John 21:1-14.

John 21:15 Jesus asks Peter, do you love me more than these scripture verse.

(ESV)  When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Feed my lambs.”
(KJV)  So when they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me more than these? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my lambs.
(MSG)  After breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” “Yes, Master, you know I love you.” Jesus said, “Feed my lambs.”
(NIV)  When they had finished eating, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?” “Yes, Lord,” he said, “you know that I love you.” Jesus said, “Feed my lambs.”
(NLT)  After breakfast Jesus asked Simon Peter, “Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?” “Yes, Lord,” Peter replied, “you know I love you.” “Then feed my lambs,” Jesus told him.

John 21:16 Jesus asks Peter again, do you love me in this Bible verse.

(ESV)  He said to him a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.”
(KJV)  He saith to him again the second time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my sheep.
(MSG)  He then asked a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” “Yes, Master, you know I love you.” Jesus said, “Shepherd my sheep.”
(NIV)  Again Jesus said, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” He answered, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus said, “Take care of my sheep.”
(NLT)  Jesus repeated the question: “Simon son of John, do you love me?” “Yes, Lord,” Peter said, “you know I love you.” “Then take care of my sheep,” Jesus said.

John 21:17 Jesus asks Simon Peter a third time in this passage, do you love me?

(ESV)  He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep.
(KJV)  He saith unto him the third time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me? Peter was grieved because he said unto him the third time, Lovest thou me? And he said unto him, Lord, thou knowest all things; thou knowest that I love thee. Jesus saith unto him, Feed my sheep.
(MSG)  Then he said it a third time: “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was upset that he asked for the third time, “Do you love me?” so he answered, “Master, you know everything there is to know. You’ve got to know that I love you.” Jesus said, “Feed my sheep.
(NIV)  The third time he said to him, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Peter was hurt because Jesus asked him the third time, “Do you love me?” He said, “Lord, you know all things; you know that I love you.” Jesus said, “Feed my sheep.
(NLT)  A third time he asked him, “Simon son of John, do you love me?” Peter was hurt that Jesus asked the question a third time. He said, “Lord, you know everything. You know that I love you.” Jesus said, “Then feed my sheep.

John 21:18 Jesus predicts how Peter will become a martyr.

(ESV)  Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were young, you used to dress yourself and walk wherever you wanted, but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and another will dress you and carry you where you do not want to go.”
(KJV)  Verily, verily, I say unto thee, When thou wast young, thou girdedst thyself, and walkedst whither thou wouldest: but when thou shalt be old, thou shalt stretch forth thy hands, and another shall gird thee, and carry thee whither thou wouldest not.
(MSG)  I’m telling you the very truth now: When you were young you dressed yourself and went wherever you wished, but when you get old you’ll have to stretch out your hands while someone else dresses you and takes you where you don’t want to go.”
(NIV)  Very truly I tell you, when you were younger you dressed yourself and went where you wanted; but when you are old you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.”
(NLT)  “I tell you the truth, when you were young, you were able to do as you liked; you dressed yourself and went wherever you wanted to go. But when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and others will dress you and take you where you don’t want to go.”

John 21:19 Jesus reaffirms the calling of Peter say, “Follow me.”

(ESV)  (This he said to show by what kind of death he was to glorify God.) And after saying this he said to him, “Follow me.”
(KJV)  This spake he, signifying by what death he should glorify God. And when he had spoken this, he saith unto him, Follow me.
(MSG)  He said this to hint at the kind of death by which Peter would glorify God. And then he commanded, “Follow me.”
(NIV)  Jesus said this to indicate the kind of death by which Peter would glorify God. Then he said to him, “Follow me!”
(NLT)  Jesus said this to let him know by what kind of death he would glorify God. Then Jesus told him, “Follow me.”

FAQ about when Jesus Restores Peter

Why does Jesus ask Peter 3 times do you love me?

Most Bible scholars connect the three-fold denial of Peter to Christ’s three-part restoration of Peter. Because the Apostle denied Jesus three times, the Lord Jesus Christ asks Peter to reaffirm his love three times. Other writers believe that Jesus was asking Peter three different questions, each time to get a deeper understanding of Peter’s love for Him. Others believe that Jesus was testing Peter’s faithfulness, and that the third time He asked, Peter finally realized that he needed to be truthful. Still others believe that Jesus was trying to show Peter how much God loves us–that He is willing to ask us over and over again until we finally understand. No matter what the reason was, it’s clear from Scripture that Jesus loved Peter very much and wanted him to know it. And even after Peter made some mistakes, Jesus continued to forgive him and showed him compassion.

How is Peter’s restoration connected by his denial of Jesus?

Peter’s restoration is connected to his denial of Jesus because, after denying Jesus three times, Peter was overcome with sadness and repentance. He went outside and wept bitterly. The Bible says that the Lord looked upon Peter with mercy, and He restored him to ministry. Peter’s restoration reminds us that God is always willing to forgive us when we repent. No matter how badly we may have sinned, God is ready to forgive us and restore us to fellowship if we are willing to turn from our sin and come back to Him.

Why did Peter deny Jesus three times?

The famously quoted words of Peter denying Jesus are found in all four Gospels (Mark 14:66-72; Matt. 26:69-75; Luke 22:54-62; John 18:13-27), so we can be confident that they actually happened. What would prompt Peter, the one who had boasted just a few hours earlier that he would never deny Christ (Mark 14:29-31), to do such a thing? We can only speculate, but it’s likely that several factors were at play. Peter denied Jesus three times because he was afraid. He was afraid of what the people would do to him if they found out he was following Jesus. He was also afraid of what would happen to him if he didn’t deny Jesus. But we can see from this that even when we are afraid, we can still choose to follow Jesus. And when we do follow him, even though it may be hard, he will always be there with us.

What is the difference between feed my lambs and feed my sheep in John 21?

In the Gospel of John, Jesus refers to his disciples as sheep, and to the people who are not yet disciples as lambs. The main difference between feeding sheep and feeding lambs is that sheep can be taught to find their own food, while lambs need to be watched over and tended to. So when Jesus says “feed my sheep”, he is saying that his disciples should not just provide for the physical needs of believers, but also teach them how to find spiritual nourishment on their own. And when Jesus says “feed my lambs”, he is indicating that there will always be a need for people who are willing to minister to those who are just starting out on their journey of faith.

What is the symbolism of sheep in the Bible?

Sheep are often used as a symbol of innocence and meekness in the Bible. In Matthew 10:16, Jesus even refers to His followers as sheep. He says, “But be on your guard against men; they will hand you over to the local councils and flog you in their synagogues.” Of course, this is referring to how the religious leaders of the time would treat anyone who disagreed with them or spoke out against them. In addition to innocence and meekness, sheep are also used as a symbol of obedience in Scripture. In Psalm 119:175, the writer says, “Let my soul live that it may praise thee; and let thy judgments help me.” In other words, he

Why did Jesus ask Peter do you love me?

The story of Jesus asking Peter whether he loved Him is a powerful one. It’s a story of forgiveness, reconciliation, and hope. In this moment, Jesus means so much to Peter. He represents everything that Peter has ever wanted: somebody who understands him, loves him unconditionally, and is willing to die for him. For all of these reasons, Jesus asked Peter if he loved Him. He needed to know that their relationship was built on more than just surface-level feelings.

More Bible Study Resources on John 21

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